How often to change bow string?

From: randy nessler <rnessler>
Subject: How often to change bow string?
Date: 5 Feb 1996 21:35:46 GMT

I have an older PSE Vulcan compound.  What is the recommended string
life for a compound bow? One season, two?  How does one store the bow to 
prolong string life?
Randy
        Assume I shoot fewer than 500 arrows a year.
                
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: stone@cwis.unomaha.edu (Travis Stone)
Subject: Re: How often to change bow string?
Date: 6 Feb 1996 14:12:16 GMT

randy nessler (rnessler) wrote:
> I have an older PSE Vulcan compound.  What is the recommended string
> life for a compound bow? One season, two?  How does one store the bow to 
> prolong string life?
> Randy
>       Assume I shoot fewer than 500 arrows a year.

It doesn't really matter if you shoot 500 arrows a year or 500 arrows a
week; all you have to do is keep your string well-waxed with beeswax,
and examine it every so often for fraying (the string starts to get
fuzzy) and broken strands.  Examine the cables for wear, and look at the
teardrops once in a while to see if the cable is pulling out.  As for
storage: compounds were designed to be left strung, so don't worry about
that.  However, don't let it lie around someplace where it can undergo
extremes of temperature and humidity---for instance, hanging it up in
the back of a pickup-truck gun-rack probably wouldn't be too good for
it.  Oh, and take it in to your favorite local pro shop, and have them
check the cams and lube up the axles once in a while.

Personally, I think that if you shoot a mere 500 arrows a year, a string
should last you at LEAST three or four years, and most likely longer.
Just keep the string waxed, and watch out for breaks and fraying!

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: ldiehr@eth233.eld.ford.com (L S Diehr (Lawrence))
Subject: Re: How often to change bow string?
Date: 7 Feb 1996 14:45:13 GMT

Trevor (Bagpuss@tantalum.demon.co.uk) wrote:
: In article <DMC69q.I9B@iquest.net>, Larry Leffew
: <dittohead@pop.iquest.net> writes
: >You should change you string at least every two years with only a 500 
: >arrow year per use. I change mine every year, early in the season 
: >allowing time for the string to "set" before I get serious about 
: >hunting. Avoid storing the string in the sunlight and keep it coated with 
: >string wax. If you ever see any fraying or a separation of any 
: >strings...change it. Better safe than sorry, a broken string can cause 
: >some major damage to your cables and other equipment. Good shooting!!
: >
: The recomendation is to replace bow stings and cables atleast once per
: year, modern materials do not show wear, but deteriorate with age, and
: use, this is especially important for compounds which are under
: continuous tension
: -- 
: Trevor

: Turnpike evaluation. For information, see http://www.turnpike.com/

I change my string ~annually - and I shoot more than most people 
~10000 shots in that time.  The main reason I change them is so I 
don't have to change the string during the tournament season (Jan-Mar)
when the intensity increases dramatically.


Larry Diehr
IMHO - I _am_ right :-)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: OHAYON  JONATHAN <ohayon@ecf.toronto.edu>
Subject: Re: How often to change bow string? 
Date: Thu, 8 Feb 1996 05:40:41 GMT



> : >You should change you string at least every two years with only a 500 
> : >arrow year per use. I change mine every year, early in the season 

> : The recomendation is to replace bow stings and cables atleast once per
> : year, modern materials do not show wear, but deteriorate with age, and
> : use, this is especially important for compounds which are under
> : continuous tension

> I change my string ~annually - and I shoot more than most people 
> ~10000 shots in that time.  The main reason I change them is so I 
> don't have to change the string during the tournament season (Jan-Mar)
> when the intensity increases dramatically.

Since I can't remember if the original post was for compounds only and 
since there are beginners out there that might think this applies to 
recurves I thought I'd put my 1.5 cents in...

On recurve you should change your string when it starts to show signs of 
fraying or one or more strand break.  Considering I shoot up to 1500 
arrows a week during my main competition period this can be quite often.  
That is why you should always have at least two strings which are exactly 
the same (should be made on same jig on same day hopefully...).  That way 
if one is going you can always replace it (even in the middle of a 
tournament if it looks like the string won't make it...)  I've had a 
string break in tournament and I can tell you that if you don't have a 
backup string you won't be very happy :>.  I've had a good string last 
for apx. 20,000 arrows but have had other last a lot less... oh another 
thing... shoot one string one day and the other the next so that way they 
are both fully stretched and nocking points are set right for when you 
need them.

Well there's a recurve point of view... just in case anyone was actually 
interested... :> 

Jonathan

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Perry Ratcliff <ratcliff@mailsrv1.trw.com>
Subject: Re: How often to change bow string?
Date: Fri, 09 Feb 96 06:03:02 PDT



> Well there's a recurve point of view... just in case anyone was actually 
> interested... :> 
> 
> Jonathan
> 

What's a recurve ;)?  (Ouch, I know I'm going to pay for that one)

Perry

----------------------------------------------------------------------------


From: OHAYON  JONATHAN <ohayon@ecf.toronto.edu>
Subject: Re: How often to change bow string? 
Date: Fri, 9 Feb 1996 23:54:41 GMT


Just as a note... this is not aimed at ALL compounds (down boys...) Just 
at Perry! :>

On Fri, 9 Feb 1996, Perry Ratcliff wrote:

> 
> 
> > Well there's a recurve point of view... just in case anyone was actually 
> > interested... :> 
> > 
> > Jonathan
> > 
> 
> What's a recurve ;)?  (Ouch, I know I'm going to pay for that one)
> 
> Perry

Well Perry, start with your compound bow, get rid of the wheels that help 
you hold REAL poundage (not 15 pounds at full draw :>), then stretch the 
bow vertically so that string clearance becomes more of a factor.  Then 
notice that there is no WALL to pull too but a large grey zone that 
*seems* all the same... Now throw out your release, peep site, and multi 
pin sights... cool!  Now you have a bow!  And you thought that you were 
doing archery before... Silly boy :> 

Jonathan

ps.- If this starts another dumb compound/recurve war it's your fault 
Perry! :>

pps - I know I will regret even answering that post... :>

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: nye@mbi.org (Jeff Nye)
Subject: Re: How often to change bow string?
Date: Fri, 9 Feb 1996 08:49:56 UNDEFINED

In article <4f7nk0$seg@s-cwis.unomaha.edu> stone@cwis.unomaha.edu (Travis Stone)
writes:
>From: stone@cwis.unomaha.edu (Travis Stone)
>Subject: Re: How often to change bow string?
>Date: 6 Feb 1996 14:12:16 GMT

>randy nessler (rnessler) wrote:
>> I have an older PSE Vulcan compound.  What is the recommended string
>> life for a compound bow? One season, two?  How does one store the bow to 
>> prolong string life?
>> Randy
>>       Assume I shoot fewer than 500 arrows a year.

>It doesn't really matter if you shoot 500 arrows a year or 500 arrows a
>week; all you have to do is keep your string well-waxed with beeswax,
>and examine it every so often for fraying (the string starts to get
>fuzzy) and broken strands.  Examine the cables for wear, and look at the
>teardrops once in a while to see if the cable is pulling out.  As for
>storage: compounds were designed to be left strung, so don't worry about
>that.  However, don't let it lie around someplace where it can undergo
>extremes of temperature and humidity---for instance, hanging it up in
>the back of a pickup-truck gun-rack probably wouldn't be too good for
>it.  Oh, and take it in to your favorite local pro shop, and have them
>check the cams and lube up the axles once in a while.

>Personally, I think that if you shoot a mere 500 arrows a year, a string
>should last you at LEAST three or four years, and most likely longer.
>Just keep the string waxed, and watch out for breaks and fraying!


One thing to remember, even though you may keep the string heavily waxed it 
won't keep it from stretching.  I had to replace my string after two years 
because it had stretched so much that my peep site was way off.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Perry Ratcliff <ratcliff@mailsrv1.trw.com>
Subject: Re: How often to change bow string?
Date: Sat, 10 Feb 96 20:55:43 PDT

I surrender. I would hate to be responsible for an all out war.

Regards,

Perry

>
> Just as a note... this is not aimed at ALL compounds (down boys...) Just
> at Perry! :>
>
> On Fri, 9 Feb 1996, Perry Ratcliff wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > > Well there's a recurve point of view... just in case anyone was actually
> > > interested... :>
> > >
> > > Jonathan
> > >
> >
> > What's a recurve ;)? (Ouch, I know I'm going to pay for that one)
> >
> > Perry
>
> Well Perry, start with your compound bow, get rid of the wheels that help
> you hold REAL poundage (not 15 pounds at full draw :>), then stretch the
> bow vertically so that string clearance becomes more of a factor. Then
> notice that there is no WALL to pull too but a large grey zone that
> *seems* all the same... Now throw out your release, peep site, and multi
> pin sights... cool! Now you have a bow! And you thought that you were
> doing archery before... Silly boy :>
>
> Jonathan
>
> ps.- If this starts another dumb compound/recurve war it's your fault
> Perry! :>
>
> pps - I know I will regret even answering that post... :>


HomeUsenetArticles*