Clickers and Stabilizers?


From: <jcheun@Po-Box.McGill.ca>
Subject: Clickers and Stabilizers?
Date: 1 Mar 1996 19:37:21 GMT

     As a beginning archer, I'd appreciate information concerning clickers 
and stibilizers.  Yes I do know what these gadgets are intended for, but I've
read that they shouln't be used by beginners until they develop better shooting
technique and form.  Is this true?  And do experienced archers really experience
a big improvement in shooting when using these gadgets?  How much of a

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Re: Clickers and Stabilizers?
From: angus@harlqn.co.uk (Angus Duggan) 
Date: 1996/03/04


In article <4h7jlh$mji@sifon.cc.mcgill.ca> <jcheun@Po-Box.McGill.ca> writes:
>
>     As a beginning archer, I'd appreciate information concerning clickers 
>and stibilizers.  Yes I do know what these gadgets are intended for, but I've
>read that they shouln't be used by beginners until they develop better shooting
>technique and form.  Is this true?  And do experienced archers really experience 
>a big improvement in shooting when using these gadgets?  How much of a
>difference do they really make?

Clickers: No, you won't notice a big improvement, in fact if you don't use it
correctly you'll quite possibly get worse when you start using a clicker. If
you start by using the clicker to prevent yourself from creeping forward, it
may help. Keep pulling through the shot, when the clicker goes, shoot, but
keep the tension on so that you get a good follow-through. If you come up and
pull, and don't come through the clicker easily, come down and try again,
don't keep hauling at it. In the long run, a clicker will improve your
consistancy.

Stabilisers: A long rod will probably make most difference initially. Don't
start by putting loads of stabilisers on the bow, start with just a long rod,
and if you want, add other stabilisers to change the feel and balance of the
bow. Don't ever put too many stabilisers on for you to comfortably control;
you shouldn't have your bow hand drop uncontrolably when you make a shot.
In the long run, stabilisers will improve your accuracy, but don't use them as
a substitute for a good technique. Just because you can hold the bow steadier
for longer with stabilisers doesn't mean that you should do.

a.
--
Angus Duggan

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From: Hywel Owen <h.owen@dl.ac.uk>
Subject: Re: Clickers and Stabilizers?
Date: Wed, 06 Mar 1996 11:15:28 +0000


<jcheun@Po-Box.McGill.ca> writes:
> >
> >     As a beginning archer, I'd appreciate information concerning clickers
> >and stibilizers.  Yes I do know what these gadgets are intended for, but I've
> >read that they shouln't be used by beginners until they develop better shooting
> >technique and form.  Is this true?  And do experienced archers really experience
> >a big improvement in shooting when using these gadgets?  How much of a
> >difference do they really make?
> 

(NB The following comments are made by an Olympic-style target 
shooter)

On the subject of clickers, I have an interesting question (well, 
interesting to me, anyway):

Someone once told me that in Korea they teach you to shoot with a 
clicker straight away, so that the archer never 'learns' the 
'stopping-at-full-draw' way of shooting. The reason for this seemed 
to be that it was better to get used to the clicker straight away 
rather than change an existing style - this way the scores get 
higher, faster. I think the great Mr.McKinney also did an article in 
'The Glade' advocating this.

Is this just an old wives' tale, or is there something to this? 

Personally, I agree with Angus - if you're already shooting without 
a clicker, changing to shooting with one is not necessarily 
straightfoward.

One thing I've often seen is that people set their clickers to 
arbitrary positions - more often than not dictated by arrows which 
are too long - and then struggle to pull through. In 'Archery in 
Earnest' by Roy Matthews (among other publications), it is stated 
that pulling the arrow _to_ the clicker is not the end of the shot: 
the object is to make the clicker part of a complete shot, including 
the follow-through; many people end up 'fighting' to come through 
the clicker.

I like to think of correct usage of the clicker as pulling _through_ 
the clicker, rather than _to_ the clicker. If you're going to use 
one, let it be your friend, not your enemy. Once you've shot with 
one for a bit, you'll understand what I mean!

Also, many people (myself included) find that the time taken for a 
shot increases once they start using a clicker. I'd say a good rule 
of thumb is that if your shot takes more than 10 seconds from 
draw-up to follow-through, then you're taking too long coming 
through the clicker (I don't imagine this is true in hunting 
situations). The top Olympic shooters take between 2.5 and 6 seconds 
for a complete shot, by the way...

As usual, these are only personal opinions, and a good coach would 
be helpful if you decide to make the change.

Hope it goes well!

Hywel Owen

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From: OHAYON  JONATHAN <ohayon@ecf.toronto.edu>
Subject: Re: Clickers and Stabilizers? 
Date: Thu, 7 Mar 1996 10:40:06 GMT


<a lot of snipped clicker stuff I agree with>

However,

> Also, many people (myself included) find that the time taken for a 
> shot increases once they start using a clicker. I'd say a good rule 
> of thumb is that if your shot takes more than 10 seconds from 
> draw-up to follow-through, then you're taking too long coming 
> through the clicker (I don't imagine this is true in hunting 
> situations). The top Olympic shooters take between 2.5 and 6 seconds 
> for a complete shot, by the way...

10 seconds is way too long.  If an archer get used to holding for 10 
seconds on every shot they are probably not using their back and our 
probably not drawing back continuously.  Also once they got up to higher 
poundage they would die.  I pull about 46 pounds and I ain't really that 
big a guy (5' 10" , 155 pounds).  I do shoot upto 200 arrows or more a 
day sometimes (especially summer season) and if I held for 10 seconds 
EVERY shot I would die.  My shots take from 3 to 5 or 6 seconods when I 
am tired.  If it takes more then that I know my back has clicked off and 
my bicep has gone into overtime.  Especially with beginners you want to 
avoid long holding.  Really bad habbit to build.

There's my 2 cents...

Jonathan

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From: doug stephens <dastephens@ccgate.hac.com>
Subject: Re: Clickers and Stabilizers?
Date: 11 Mar 1996 18:35:05 GMT

As a new archer it has been suggested that I not try to shoot so fast (2 to 5 sec).  Rather I 
should take a little more time in the aiming.  Needless to say this has improved my scores.  My 
warm up practice, usually at about 7 yards, routine is to stay on target for about 20 seconds 
before I release.  The goal is to build additional strength and confidence.  In real life I'm 
proably on target about 10 seconds for each shot.

However, If I was able to find the time to shoot 200 a day I might tend to agree with you.

Please go a little further in depth with respect to the back and bicep issue.  My strain is 
gernerally on the right sholder and back.  Am I pulled wrong??

Doug


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