Fluted arrow shafts?? Maybe I'm going bonkers..


From: Omar Almaini <omar@ast.cam.ac.uk> Subject: Fluted arrow shafts?? Maybe I'm going bonkers.. Date: 5 Feb 1996 16:51:20 GMT After reading the surreal debate on the advantages or otherwise of drilling holes in your riser (I was tempted to post something like "the holes are without doubt the strongest part of your bow with the remarkable property that they actually weigh less as they get larger...") I had an uncanny flashback to the page of an archery catalogue that I bought years ago just as I started archery. Is it just me, or does anyone else remember a weird and wonderful arrow called the Fluted Arrow Shaft which wasn't quite cylindrical but had an indented groove along the side. I can't remember the advantages claimed for these arrows but I presume the design made them stiffer which allowed the weight to be reduced, smaller diameter etc.. I'd love to know if anyone has shot these arrows and what finally became of them. Does anyone think they were a good idea? Ahead of its time maybe?? Or maybe I'm going completely mad and just dreamt the whole thing.... Omar
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: jdickson@festival.ed.ac.uk (John Dickson)
Subject: Re: Fluted arrow shafts?? Maybe I'm going bonkers..
Date: 6 Feb 1996 09:56:30 GMT

Omar Almaini <omar@ast.cam.ac.uk> writes:

>Is it just me, or does anyone else remember a weird and wonderful arrow
>called the Fluted Arrow Shaft which wasn't quite cylindrical but had 
>an indented groove along the side. I can't remember the advantages
>claimed for these arrows but I presume the design made them stiffer
>which allowed the weight to be reduced, smaller diameter etc..

>I'd love to know if anyone has shot these arrows and what finally
>became of them. Does anyone think they were a good idea? Ahead of its
>time maybe??

>Or maybe I'm going completely mad and just dreamt the whole thing....

Hi Omar,
       No, you're absoloutely right, fluted shafts did exist and in
field archery they were quite popular around 1985-1987....even
Mackenzies in Edinburgh sold them!

A few problems which I know of (other than those listed by "Olympic
Question"...some people have wierd names ;-) 

They are a bugger to straighten because of the flute.

You get pissed off because every now and then you don't get a
line-cutter because you have a flute where you would have got it with a
trad. shaft!

They carve chunks out of your pressure button if you set the nock the
*wrong way*.

They seemed to peform pretty well though but not necessarily any better.

I think they were supposed to be more difficult to bend but now things
are getting vague!

Ahh the days when Severns had Nishizawas in the catalogue...not too
mention... gasp... swing bars ;-)


John Dickson,(aka Stretch)  
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: olympic question <103625.1242@CompuServe.COM>
Subject: Re: Fluted arrow shafts?? Maybe I'm going bonkers..
Date: 6 Feb 1996 03:05:57 GMT


Re fluted shafts- Yes you are right on both counts but the 
company went under due to poor sales,fleching the arrows were a 
problem because of the flutes leaving a gap under the vane and 
whistling during flite.Also carbons made their debut in 3-D abuot 
the same time,I don't think that they are around anymore.

                                Sean
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Re: Fluted arrow shafts?? Maybe I'm going bonkers..
From: Hywel Owen <h.owen@dl.ac.uk> 
Date: 1996/02/06


Ah yes!
I remember them well.... they were pretty awful! You had to make 
sure the nocks has exactly the same orientation with respect to the 
flutes, or your button would be pressing either on a 'ridge' or a 
'trough', thus sending the arrows left or right. Another reason they 
fell from favour was that the alloy they were made from was pretty 
poor - and you couldn't straighten them easily, of course!
Another blast from the past... do you remember those funny rubber 
things, that Atletic sold, to put on the end of your stabilisers. I 
wonder where they went...? Hang on a minute, they're the latest 
'gizmos', aren't they...?
:)
Yours in jest,
Hywel
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: jdickson@festival.ed.ac.uk (John Dickson)
Subject: Re: Fluted arrow shafts?? Maybe I'm going bonkers..
Date: 6 Feb 1996 13:03:18 GMT

Hywel Owen <h.owen@dl.ac.uk> writes:

>Another blast from the past... do you remember those funny rubber 
>things, that Atletic sold, to put on the end of your stabilisers. I 
>wonder where they went...? Hang on a minute, they're the latest 
>'gizmos', aren't they...?

So who said that we were ever quick to take up on good ideas? The fact
that top European archers have been using these for years and "gee look
Jay Barrs is using them" and all of a sudden Quicks have them!

I'm reluctant to admit it but they work, I get mine on Friday ;) Wibble
wobble.

                                Stretch

PS On the subject I reckon the ones that Quicks are selling are too
stiff to really work *that well*. The ones by Jim Buchanan and Eddie
Robinson are more effective...although may need the rubber changed after
a while. I don't care if they look silly, as long as they work!
Wibble-wobble


John Dickson,(aka Stretch)      
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: ianh@liverpool.ac.uk (Mr I.M. Hannaford)
Subject: Re: Fluted arrow shafts?? Maybe I'm going bonkers..
Date: Wed, 7 Feb 1996 13:21:42 GMT

In article <4f6gil$6cf$1@mhade.production.compuserve.com>, olympic question
<103625.1242@CompuServe.COM> writes:
> Re fluted shafts- Yes you are right on both counts but the 
> company went under due to poor sales,fleching the arrows were a 
> problem because of the flutes leaving a gap under the vane and 
> whistling during flite.Also carbons made their debut in 3-D abuot 
> the same time,I don't think that they are around anymore.
> 
>                               Sean

Weren't they called "Excalibur" or something similar? If I remember
rightly, they came out as the original Easton A/C arrows and so were
slightly overshadowed. I never used them myself but members of my
club had a go and it seems that the company went bust for good reason. 

Ian Hannaford


HomeUsenetArticles*