Involuntary loosing


From           doug@meditor.demon.co.uk (Doug Richardson)
Date           Sun, 25 Feb 1996 21:06:10 GMT


About 18 months ago I returned to target archery, not having shot 
for more than 30 years.
 
Iím shooting with a small local club, where instruction/coaching is 
minimal, and have hit an awkward problem - Iím loosing before the 
sight is on target. 

At first, the problem took the form on the occasional inadvertent 
loose either just before or just after coming to full draw. The arrow 
would simply go, taking me by surprise.

Then I found growing difficulty in aligning the bowsight with the 
target.  As the sight reached the red ring, the drawing fingers would 
loose the arrow.

I tried to cure the problem by coming to full draw seven or eight 
times per end, using the "extra" draws simply to hold the sight 
on target, then come down. In this way I hoped to break the mental 
connection between the sight coming on target, and the act of 
loosing. At first this trick was useful, but by late last year I 
found that the muscles in my arms and upper body would give a spasm 
as the sight approached the target. 

Now the loose has become almost involuntary, even when I come to full 
draw not intending to loose. I stand on the shooting line determined 
not to loose until the sight is one target, yet away goes that arrow 
as soon as the sight reaches the red ring. Itís as if those three 
drawing fingers have acquired a life of their own. 

Has anyone else hit this problem, or can anyone suggest a possible 
solution? Itís annoying to be faced with a problem which doesnít 
respond to logical thought and old-fashioned willpower. Although 
I could see that a bad habit was forming, trying hard to curb it 
simply had no effect.

Looking back, I can see one factor which helped this habit develop. 
Last spring, I found that the crease of my second finger tended to 
become painful under the pressure from the string. At the time I 
assumed this was a touch of arthritis, and would have to be lived 
with. However, the discomfort did tend to encourage a quick release 
once at full draw. 

In the last five months Iíve done very little shooting (due to 
pressure of work and the often-inclement British weather), and the 
soreness vanished. So I guess I must have hurt that finger in some 
way, perhaps by shooting a 36lb bow using only a simple single-layer 
leather tab to protect what are essentially thin and bony fingers. 
Iíve tried a modern two-layer tab, but having learned using the basic 
tab, I find the newer designs clumsy and restrictive. 

Thirty years ago, I remember the books and magazines sounding off on
what was called "gold shyness" - an inability to get the sight on the 
gold. Sounds like a form of my problem. Strangely enough, none of the 
modern books Iíve bought even mentions the subject.  Has "gold shyness" 
become a problem of the past?

Iíve never been interested in shooting competitively, so have a light 
(32lb) recurve bow able to make the 80 yard distance at which most of 
our club shooting is done. However, I did notice that on the few 
occasions when I have shot competitively, the problem disappeared! I
had no difficulty in getting the sight on target.

Regards,

Doug Richardson

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Subject: Re: Involuntary loosing
From: STRAIGHT ARROW <bowhunt@rmii.com> 
Date: 1996/02/24



The problem is now called target panic!  A lot of people are afflicted, 
two remedies you might try is the blank bale method. Stand very close to 
a bale without a target draw the bow with your eyes closed just 
visulizing the shot and the loose the arrow into the bale. Do this 
several times before you start practicing for the day, this will help you 
know what a good shot is supposed to feel like.  Two, use a cliker, when 
you hear the cliker go off you shoot, eventually you will be more worried 
about good form than aiming and you will forget about target panic. 
hope this helps.let me know.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Involuntary loosing
From: bo448@torfree.net (Rob Lee)
Date           Sun, 25 Feb 1996 06:58:23 GMT


Doug Richardson (doug@meditor.demon.co.uk) wrote:

<snip>
: as soon as the sight reaches the red ring. It's as if those three 
: drawing fingers have acquired a life of their own. 

: Has anyone else hit this problem, or can anyone suggest a possible
: solution?

Yes, and yes.  Try shooting on an empty target butt.  Even better, shoot 
from really close (5-6 yards) with your eyes closed (once you've aligned 
with the butt :-) )  Just try and get the feel of loosing the arrow 
without having to aim.

: Thirty years ago, I remember the books and magazines sounding off
: of what was called "gold shyness" - an inability to get the sight
: on the gold. Sounds like a form of my problem. Strangely enough, 
: none of the modern books I've bought even mentions the subject. 
: Has "gold shyness" become a problem of the past?

Current terminology is "target panic"

: I've never been interested in shooting competitively, so have a 
: light (32lb) bow able to make the 80 yard distance at which most
: of our club shooting is done. However, I did notice that on the 
: few occasions when I have shot competitively, the problem 
: disappears!

Usually happens the other way around, drive nails in practice then shoot 
7s in a tournament.

Regards, 

Rob Lee

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Subject: Re: Involuntary loosing
From: barbara ann masom <barbara@wickhill.demon.co.uk> 
Date: 1996/02/26


In article <825013300.15525@meditor.demon.co.uk>
           doug@meditor.demon.co.uk "Doug Richardson" writes:

> About 18 months ago I returned to target archery, not having
> shot for more than 30 years. 
> 
> I've never been interested in shooting competitively, so have a 
> light (32lb) bow able to make the 80 yard distance at which most
> of our club shooting is done. However, I did notice that on the 
> few occasions when I have shot competitively, the problem 
> disappears!

Hi Doug 

what you have experienced is not unusual and it is often caused my 
loss of concentration particularly with beginners??

I have even now a similar problem when I am more concerned with the 
activity of archery ie; enjoying the action rather than the result.

in your last paragraph you gave yourself the answer.

When you compete you become more focused and concentrate more on the shot
and the result, than the general experience and enjoyment.

The big problem is that archery is just to much fun

regards Chris Christopherson

email; chris@wickhill.demon.co.uk

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Subject: Re: Involuntary loosing
From: jagj@rhyolite.win-uk.net (John  Jones)
Date: Mon, 26 Feb 1996 08:42:12 GMT


 
In article <825282370.10951@meditor.demon.co.uk>, Doug Richardson (doug@meditor.demon.co.uk) writes:
>About 18 months ago I returned to target archery, not having shot 
>for more than 30 years.
> 
>Iím shooting with a small local club, where instruction/coaching is 
>minimal, and have hit an awkward problem - Iím loosing before the 
>sight is on target. 
>

You don't say where you live, but your County and Region should
have a Coaching organisation which should run coaching
sessions. Contact the County Coaching Organiser (your Club
secretary should have his/her name), and get them to give you
some coaching. This is a very common problem - you're not alone!

John Jones 

--------------------------------------------------------------------
             
Subject: Re: Involuntary loosing
From: BentStik@icanect.net 
Date: 1996/02/27


doug@meditor.demon.co.uk (Doug Richardson) wrote:
>I'm shooting with a small local club, where instruction/coaching
>is minimal, and have hit an awkward problem - I'm loosing before 
>the sight is on target. 

>Now the loose has become almost involuntary, even when I come to full 
>draw not intending to loose. I stand on the shooting line determined 
>not to loose until the sight is one target, yet away goes that arrow 
>as soon as the sight reaches the red ring. It's as if those three 
>drawing fingers have acquired a life of their own. 

>Has anyone else hit this problem, or can anyone suggest a possible
>solution?

>Thirty years ago, I remember the books and magazines sounding off
>of what was called "gold shyness" - an inability to get the sight
>on the gold. Sounds like a form of my problem.
>Has "gold shyness" become a problem of the past?

Doug, I believe the symptoms you described are now referred to as
"target panic".  I sometimes find myself afflicted by this
psychological disorder also.  From what I've read the condition can be
linked to being overbowed, in which case developing the shooting
muscles to be able to pull more than your normal bow weight would
probably help, and a purely mind over matter situation where your body
overrules your mind and instincts as to when you are truely on target.
Try shooting a lighter bow and see if you are still afflicted by this
condition.  If you still are try holding off to the side and then
bring your bow on target after you have been holding at full draw.  I
don't use sights and a lot of barebow shooters of traditional
equipment like myself sometimes confuse this condition with "snap
shooting" which is a legitamate draw release situation where the
shooter simply draws, instinctively comes up on the target and
releases voluntarily.  "Target Panic causes an involuntary premature
release.  -SP-


-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Involuntary loosing 
Date: 1 Mar 1996 15:21:28 GMT 
From: rt12@ix.netcom.com(anonymous)


In <4gtoi6$mo@news.icanect.net> BentStik@icanect.net writes:
>
>doug@meditor.demon.co.uk (Doug Richardson) wrote:
>>I'm shooting with a small local club, where instruction/coaching
>>is minimal, and have hit an awkward problem - I'm loosing before
>>the sight is on target.
>
>>Now the loose has become almost involuntary, even when I come to full

>>draw not intending to loose. I stand on the shooting line determined
>>not to loose until the sight is one target, yet away goes that arrow
>>as soon as the sight reaches the red ring. It's as if those three
>>drawing fingers have acquired a life of their own.
>
>>Has anyone else hit this problem, or can anyone suggest a possible
>>solution?
>
>>Thirty years ago, I remember the books and magazines sounding off
>>of what was called "gold shyness" - an inability to get the sight
>>on the gold. Sounds like a form of my problem.
>>Has "gold shyness" become a problem of the past?
>
>Doug, I believe the symptoms you described are now referred to as
>"target panic".  I sometimes find myself afflicted by this
>psychological disorder also.  From what I've read the condition can be
>linked to being overbowed, in which case developing the shooting
>muscles to be able to pull more than your normal bow weight would
>probably help, and a purely mind over matter situation where your body
>overrules your mind and instincts as to when you are truely on target.
>Try shooting a lighter bow and see if you are still afflicted by this
>condition.  If you still are try holding off to the side and then
>bring your bow on target after you have been holding at full draw.  I
>don't use sights and a lot of barebow shooters of traditional
>equipment like myself sometimes confuse this condition with "snap
>shooting" which is a legitamate draw release situation where the
>shooter simply draws, instinctively comes up on the target and
>releases voluntarily.  "Target Panic causes an involuntary premature
>release.  -SP-
>
Mr.SP is correct Target Panic of some kind is a problem all of us have
or will face sometime or another ,thats Pros and part time shooters!
It comes in the form of punching of the trigger release or just the
inability to hold in the Gold. What has worked for me is try when
laying in bed pin a target on the wall ,point your finger which holds
the bow at the target, with other hand make believe you are releasing
the string or sqeezing the trigger .Do this over and over again , go
through the motion mentally without the bow. Archery is 90% mental.

I have found recently a release that Works great for punching is the
Answer Release . When at full draw most people will punch the trigger
shooting a bad arrow , this release will not let the arrow go! you can
reset it by putting your trigger finger behind the trigger and pushing
forward , then you can sqeeze again and again until you stop punching.
>This has helped me aim and eliminate my panic . I had a hard time
getting this release , my dealer said they are in big Demand. I know
why!Good Shooting!!

 
Trying To Help

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