Mongol archery

From: gmcdon6039@aol.com (GMcdon6039)
Subject: Mongol archery
Date: 25 Nov 1995 04:48:50 -0500


I am interested in mongolian archery.  I would like to know where I could
get a mongol style recurve bow.  Also I am loking for anyone who shoots
using a thumb ring. I could use some help on aiming with it. 

I would also be interested in getting any reference material on this
subject.

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From: duvernay@sejong.dongguk.ac.kr (Prof. Thomas Duvernay)
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 25 Nov 1995 15:17:24 GMT


GMcdon6039 (gmcdon6039@aol.com) wrote:
: I am interested in mongolian archery.  I would like to know where I could
: get a mongol style recurve bow.  Also I am loking for anyone who shoots
: using a thumb ring. I could use some help on aiming with it. 

: I would also be interested in getting any reference material on this
: subject.

A very close relative to Mongolian archery is Korean archery.  You might
like to look at the article I wrote.
http://www.dongguk.ac.kr/duvernay/korarch.html

Thomas

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From: akarpowicz@mta.ca
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 25 Nov 1995 19:09:53 GMT
Reply-To: akarpowicz@mta.ca


In article <496oq2$qcn@newsbf02.news.aol.com>, gmcdon6039@aol.com (GMcdon6039) writes:
>I am interested in mongolian archery.  I would like to know where I could
>get a mongol style recurve bow.  Also I am loking for anyone who shoots
>using a thumb ring. I could use some help on aiming with it. 

Look into the asian-turk FAQ, there are refs on this subject.
Aiming is instinctive, no sights, you will not see the arrow point
since the arrows are shot from the right side of the bow (for right
handed).

Good luck

Adam

>
>I would also be interested in getting any reference material on this
>subject.

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From: akarpowicz@mta.ca
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 4 Dec 1995 12:43:05 GMT
Reply-To: akarpowicz@mta.ca


In article <49ttco$2r6@tst.hk.super.net>, Stephen Selby <srselby@hk.super.net> writes:
>The modern Mongolian Bow is similar to the Chinese Ming bow, and is really very big 
>- not like the small Korean bows made by Samick. They are nearer the 66" used in 
>western target archery.

I did not know Samick makes Korean bows, I suppose they use modern
materials, could you post the phone no.?

>
>They are still being made in Mongolia. I am going to try to get one there in May 
>1996. But one problem is that the traditional bow takes badly to moisture.
>
>-- 


Chinese used to keep their bows hung in cabinets, heated with a small
fire at bottom, you could try something similar. These bows are indeed
very reactive to moisture, my Turk bow was #100 in the winter at 20-30%
RH, dropped to #60 in the summer. Now I keep it strung constantly to
make sure it does not gain weight.

Adam


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From: Stephen Selby <srselby@hk.super.net>
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 4 Dec 1995 04:28:08 GMT
To: gmcdon6039@aol.com


The modern Mongolian Bow is similar to the Chinese Ming bow, and is really very big 
- not like the small Korean bows made by Samick. They are nearer the 66" used in 
western target archery.

They are still being made in Mongolia. I am going to try to get one there in May 
1996. But one problem is that the traditional bow takes badly to moisture.

-- 
Stephen Selby

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From: duvernay@sejong.dongguk.ac.kr (Prof. Thomas Duvernay)
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 6 Dec 1995 23:35:18 GMT


akarpowicz@mta.ca wrote:


: Could you explain this band, I do not quite understand how  it works?
: Is it just a marker to tell which bows are to be strung longer?


: Adam

The band is usually some kind of elastic band, although many people
use a braided yarn or leather.  It is about three inches in diameter.
It is used to somewhat keep the bow in balance when strung, but not
being used.  Fit it snug over one end (not too snug).

Thomas

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From: duvernay@sejong.dongguk.ac.kr (Prof. Thomas Duvernay)
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 6 Dec 1995 06:30:05 GMT


: Chinese used to keep their bows hung in cabinets, heated with a small
: fire at bottom, you could try something similar. These bows are indeed
: very reactive to moisture, my Turk bow was #100 in the winter at 20-30%
: RH, dropped to #60 in the summer. Now I keep it strung constantly to
: make sure it does not gain weight.

: Adam

Here in Korea, cabinets are still used.  However, they are heated with
a light bulb instead of a fire.
Yes, Asian traditional bows are susceptible to temperature and moisture.
The draw weight will increase and decrease accordingly.  Be careful when
keeping it constantly strung; when Koreans have theirs strung for any
length of time without use, they slip a band down over one end.  However,
keeping it constantly strung (more than a few hours) is not recommended.
When bracing it, be sure to heat the limbs and balance them; this may 
help your problem somewhat.

BTW, Samick does make a decent modern Korean traditional bow.  If anyone
is interested in a true Korean horn bow, please let me know; I can help
you out.  If the bowyer has them in stock, they are readily available;
otherwise there may be some wait.  Right now, my master bowyer friend
is attaching sinew on another batch of bows (about a hundred).  The 
glue must cure for about a year.
I will be out of Korea for a couple of months starting next week, but
you can still contact me at my Korean address.

Thomas
duvernay@wonhyo.dongguk.ac.kr

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From: duvernay@sejong.dongguk.ac.kr (Prof. Thomas Duvernay)
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 6 Dec 1995 23:35:18 GMT


akarpowicz@mta.ca wrote:


: Could you explain this band, I do not quite understand how  it works?
: Is it just a marker to tell which bows are to be strung longer?


: Adam

The band is usually some kind of elastic band, although many people
use a braided yarn or leather.  It is about three inches in diameter.
It is used to somewhat keep the bow in balance when strung, but not
being used.  Fit it snug over one end (not too snug).

Thomas

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From: greeff@alf.zfn.uni-bremen.de (Oliver Greeff)
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 8 Dec 1995 10:30:44 GMT


akarpowicz@mta.ca wrote:
: In article <4a3d9d$qp7@xpat.postech.ac.kr>, duvernay@sejong.dongguk.ac.kr (Prof. Thomas Duvernay) writes:
: >>
: >Here in Korea, cabinets are still used.  However, they are heated with
: >a light bulb instead of a fire.

: Good idea, this is what I do to re-condition a bow.

: >Yes, Asian traditional bows are susceptible to temperature and moisture.
: >The draw weight will increase and decrease accordingly.  Be careful when
: >keeping it constantly strung; when Koreans have theirs strung for any
: >length of time without use, they slip a band down over one end.

: Could you explain this band, I do not quite understand how  it works?
: Is it just a marker to tell which bows are to be strung longer?

:   However,
: >keeping it constantly strung (more than a few hours) is not recommended.
: >When bracing it, be sure to heat the limbs and balance them; this may 
: >help your problem somewhat.

: The bow is very heavy, even when balanced perfectly (took me two days
: to do it, with heating and all). I saw Turk-like bows in a museum
: recently, the limbs were very thick, even in a small bow. These were
: war bows, strung for long periods of time. I believe the bows had to be
: so heavy to keep the weight high enough when strung so long. I kept
: my bow strung for 1.5 years (with short interruptions during re-tillering),
: it seems to stay at #60 and does not loose weight any more.

: Adam



Hi folks

there is a bow-supplier here in Germany who sells A Mongolian-type composite 
bow made of wood, horn and tendons. It looks pretty strange, but it is hand-
made (I do not know where) and is shot with a silk-string. Its price is about
2700 DM equalling roughly 1900 US$. If someone should be interested in the 
address of the shop, email me and I can respond.
To: oliver@postgate.mpi-mm.uni-bremen.de
Hear ya.

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From: duvernay@sejong.postech.ac.kr (Prof. Thomas Duvernay)
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 8 Dec 1995 23:23:32 GMT


Oliver Greeff (greeff@alf.zfn.uni-bremen.de) wrote:

: Hi folks

: there is a bow-supplier here in Germany who sells A Mongolian-type composite 
: bow made of wood, horn and tendons. It looks pretty strange, but it is hand-
: made (I do not know where) and is shot with a silk-string. Its price is about
: 2700 DM equalling roughly 1900 US$. If someone should be interested in the 
: address of the shop, email me and I can respond.
: To: oliver@postgate.mpi-mm.uni-bremen.de
: Hear ya.

$1,900?  An authentic Korean horn bow costs about $600 (US).  I wonder
what kind of markup Mongolian bows have.

Thomas

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From: akarpowicz@mta.ca
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 7 Dec 1995 13:03:50 GMT
Reply-To: akarpowicz@mta.ca


In article <4a59bm$rll@xpat.postech.ac.kr>, duvernay@sejong.dongguk.ac.kr (Prof. Thomas Duvernay) writes:
>
>The band is usually some kind of elastic band, although many people
>use a braided yarn or leather.  It is about three inches in diameter.
>It is used to somewhat keep the bow in balance when strung, but not
>being used.  Fit it snug over one end (not too snug).
>
>Thomas
>

This is interesting, I understand the band was slipped over the ear
and part way down the siyah of the stronger limb of a bow, pressing
the string against the limb, thus bending it slightly more than the
other limb. The bow would keep the tiller until shot. The Korean bows
must be extremely unstable, more than Turkish, if such operations
were needed. At the same time the bows may be more efficient at such
extreme bend in the limbs.

Adam

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From: duvernay@sejong.dongguk.ac.kr (Prof. Thomas Duvernay)
Subject: Re: Mongol archery
Date: 8 Dec 1995 00:08:31 GMT


akarpowicz@mta.ca wrote:

: This is interesting, I understand the band was slipped over the ear
: and part way down the siyah of the stronger limb of a bow, pressing
: the string against the limb, thus bending it slightly more than the
: other limb. The bow would keep the tiller until shot. The Korean bows
: must be extremely unstable, more than Turkish, if such operations
: were needed. At the same time the bows may be more efficient at such
: extreme bend in the limbs.

: Adam



I like to use the word 'sensitive,' instead of 'unstable.' ;)
Yes, the bows are very efficient.

Thomas



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