What type of release?

From: mgrove@polarnet.fnsb.ak.us (Mel Grove)
Subject: What type of release?
Date: Mon, 05 Feb 1996 19:27:30 GMT

Does anyone have any advice on what type of release is preferred or
which to stay away from?

I'm new to this sport and there are just too many to choose from
without any knowledge of what to consider.

Any advice would be appreciated!
Mel

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From: bran@unity.ncsu.edu (David Pickens)
Subject: Re: What type of release?
Date: 6 Feb 1996 11:00:27 GMT


>Does anyone have any advice on what type of release is preferred or
>which to stay away from?

>I'm new to this sport and there are just too many to choose from
without any knowledge of what to consider.

>Any advice would be appreciated!
>Mel
.................................................................

Fingers work good:) but he asked about a release.Check out the Scott at
your local pro-shop.They are easy on strings and you don't get the plucking
the string that happens from time to time with fingers.I'm not knocking 
fingers I still manage to take deer with my old stick bow with fingers;):)
Leather covered fingers though(tab):)Stay away from the pinch roller type.
They are hell on strings.I use the scott on both my Hoyts and have no 
string problems(fraying)etc.Try a scott before you buy anything,if possible.
                       Good Hunting
                        David

+ David B. Pickens 

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Re: What type of release?
From: olympic question <103625.1242@CompuServe.COM> 
Date: 1996/02/06


Mel-First off a good release is about 100$ so that narrows it 
abit,next thing is that they can be classed into two 
groups,T-handle and concho(wrist),now find one that is 
comfortable in your hand and at full draw this should limit it 
down to a hand full after that it is personal preference.Look for 
failsafe features(safety locks),ease of ajustment etc.

                                        Sean

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From: Perry Ratcliff <ratcliff@mailsrv1.trw.com>
Subject: Re: What type of release?
Date: Tue, 06 Feb 96 07:17:35 PDT


What kind of shooting are you primarily interested in?

You may opt for speed and ease of use for Hunting <you will receive
plenty of advice from this group in that area>, or a more forgiving
release for target/field.

For target/field archery Carter makes the best releases available
today.  They have a variety of releases for Pinkie Finger, Thumb
Release, and Cam Release (similiar to Stanislawski).

The Stanislawski or Stanislawski Like releases are the best selection
for people that have problems with target panic or jumping on the 
trigger.  They can be a bear to learn to shoot though.

If you chose a Carter Release, let me know and I will provide some
follow-up advice on customizing the trigger.

Good Shooting!

Perry

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Re: What type of release?
From: ldiehr@eth233.eld.ford.com (L S Diehr (Lawrence)) 
Date: 1996/02/06

Perry Ratcliff (ratcliff@mailsrv1.trw.com) wrote:

: What kind of shooting are you primarily interested in?

<snip>

: If you chose a Carter Release, let me know and I will provide some
: follow-up advice on customizing the trigger.

: Good Shooting!

: Perry

I shoot a Carter (Big Kid 3D), and am interested in what kind of suggestions
you have for modifying the trigger?

--
Larry Diehr
IMHO - I _am_ right :-)

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From: Perry Ratcliff <ratcliff@mailsrv1.trw.com>
Subject: Re: What type of release?
Date: Wed, 07 Feb 96 18:14:56 PDT


> I shoot a Carter (Big Kid 3D), and am interested in what kind of suggestions
> you have for modifying the trigger?
> 
> --
> Larry Diehr
> IMHO - I _am_ right :-)


I'm a fanatic about never adjusting to your equipment.  I struggled with 
a carter thumb release for about 4 months with very little success.  I was
always trying to figure out how to make the shot go off without punching 
the trigger.  My previous release was a Golden Touch Pinkie Finger release.
I shot the Golden Touch well but the rollers wore out on the release pretty
quickly and caused the timing to change.

To correct my form problems with the Carter release, I went to the local
hardware store and picked up some Epoxy Putty.  I used this putty to 
reshape the trigger in a more natural position for my thumb.  To fine tune
the shape, I used a Dremel Tool.  I ended up with a curved trigger with the 
joint of my thumb just catching the forward edge of the curved shape.  When I 
increase back tension the joint of the thumb naturally pulls back on the 
tigger, making it go off similiarly to a Stanislawski.  I have no consious 
effort of pushing the trigger with my thumb.

To get the position of the trigger right you will need a second person
to observe where your thumb naturally lies when you reach full draw.  Have
the second person form the putty around the joint of the thumb with some
excess putty on the forward edge.  That way you can use a dremel tool or
file to shape the hardened epoxy with an edge where the joint of your
thumb catches the new trigger.

Don't be surprised if it takes several tries before you get this 
perfected.  Its worth the effort though, if you are struggling with 
trigger control your problem may just be that you are searching for the 
trigger. 

I have shot my release like this for over a year now with good success.

Hope you find this useful.

PS:  I also special order heavy springs from Carter to slow the
     release down.  Fast triggers are an invitation to form problems
     that are hard to resist.  You can relax with a slow trigger with
     the knowledge that it will never go off on you before you get 
     settled on the target. 

Good Shooting!

Perry

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