Releases


Subject: releases 
Date: 28 Feb 1996 04:33:03 GMT 
From: DCA04@ttacs3.ttu.edu (rogge, james)



I have a question, What are the best releases.  I have heard the tabs work
 O.K.  I learned to use glove.  Should I change to a mechanical release, or
stay the same.  I was told that I would get a better pattern if I changed
to a tab.  Is that true.  I hope that someone can help me.  If I was going
to change what would be the best release to change to?

Thanks

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Subject: Re: releases 
Date: Wed, 28 Feb 1996 20:47:08 -0800 
From: shaneg@ix.netcom.com (Shane Greif)


In article <4h0ltv$jc7@hydra.acs.ttu.edu>, DCA04@ttacs3.ttu.edu (rogge,
james) wrote:

> I have a question, What are the best releases.  I have heard the tabs work
>  O.K.  I learned to use glove.  Should I change to a mechanical release, or
> stay the same.  I was told that I would get a better pattern if I changed
> to a tab.  Is that true.  I hope that someone can help me.  If I was going
> to change what would be the best release to change to?
>
> Thanks


OH GOOD!! I'm First!

I've used the Freeflight for 6 years and it's just know getting broken in.
It's a glove type and fully adjustable trigger.

Shoot straight ==>

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Subject: Re: releases 
Date: 1 Mar 1996 02:22:16 GMT 
From: rt12@ix.netcom.com(anonymous)


In <4h0ltv$jc7@hydra.acs.ttu.edu> DCA04@ttacs3.ttu.edu (rogge, james)
writes:


>I have a question, What are the best releases.  I have heard the tabs work
> O.K.  I learned to use glove.  Should I change to a mechanical release, or
>stay the same.  I was told that I would get a better pattern if I changed
>to a tab.  Is that true.  I hope that someone can help me.  If I was going
>to change what would be the best release to change to?
>
>Thanks

The reason why a mechanical release is better than fingers is that it
provides less contact with string ,hence a cleaner release of the
string. When the first was introduced in the late 60s at vegas the PAA
Professional Archery Association wanted it banded because the shooters
Tony Marino and Fred Troncoso won and posted some of the highest scores
never shot with a Tab. They finally after a big fight legalized the
release and gave it its own class . Yes it will give you tighter groups
and improve your scores. Several I Recommend are the caliper type
Sharpshooter caliper or the Fletchhunter concho or wrist.
By the way I was at the Vegas Shoot in 1968 . 6years old.


Trying To Help
   RT

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Re: releases
From: ersons@uslink.net 
Date: 1996/02/29


Hi

I also started out with a fingers glove. I used this for many years while 
i was learning to shoot a recurve with no sights. When i finally bought a 
compound i lost my glove and a friend let me use an old tab he had lieing 
around. I was amazed!! I shoot a decent group at 30 yards but the tab 
pulled me in at least 2 inches more the first time i used it. Try it you 
have very little to lose.

A mechanical release is very nice and should pull your group in tighter 
yet but keep in mind that you must use a rest designed for a mechanical 
release. This is the reason i don't use one. I realy like my flipper rest 
and don't have the money to shell out for the release and then to get a 
new rest. After you do that you are back to retuneing your bow. I just 
like to shoot. I don't want to spent alot of time and money refiting 
everything. Besides i shoot 3-d meets and i don't want to change classes. 
I find that the competition in fingers is stiff enough.

Hope this helps.

snowdrifter
ersons@uslink.net

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Re: releases
From: Hywel Owen <h.owen@dl.ac.uk> 
Date: 1996/03/01


For target use I've always liked mechanical releases which are held 
in the palm. e.g. Fletchmatic thumb-type. Wrist releases are 
comfortable but I find that you get wrist tension with them, which 
can give variable shots. With a fourth-finger (i.e. little finger) 
release, while squeezing the trigger there is a tendency to pull the 
third finger as well (with an empty hand, try moving your fourth 
finger without moving the third one - it can be hard!). My favourite 
are thumb releases, with the palm facing outwards to get an accurate 
anchor point. The thumb is 'disconnected' from the fingers holding 
the release, so there is no twisting as you squeeze off the shot. 
Also, I find it easier to get a good anchor point than with wrist or 
concho types.

Hope this is of use.

Hywel

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From: Jack Yoder <yoder@ssdd.nrl.navy.mil>
Subject: Re: releases
Date: Sun, 03 Mar 1996 17:47:56 -0500

rogge, james wrote:
> 
> I have a question, What are the best releases.  I have heard the tabs work
>  O.K.  I learned to use glove.  Should I change to a mechanical release, or
> stay the same.  I was told that I would get a better pattern if I changed
> to a tab.  Is that true.  I hope that someone can help me.  If I was going
> to change what would be the best release to change to?
> 
> Thanks

In general, mechanical releases will improve your accuracy especially 
with a faster bow.  Another reply made reference to the effects of a 
changing to a mechanical release has on rest selection.  This is good 
advice.  
Another consideration when choosing a rest is serving wear.  If you 
shoot or practice alot with a caliper or bearing release you will go 
through servings much quicker than your are use to.  One solution to 
this is a rope type release.  The seem to be much kinder to the serving. 
 Another solution is an ultra nock (made by QAD).  It replaces the nock 
set on your serving.  Your grab this device with your bering or caliper 
release instead of the serving.  It may weigh slightly more than a nock 
set.  Just another of the 1000's of tradeoff's in archery setup.  There 
are similar competing products, ultra nock is the one I use and I'm 
happy with it.

Another consideration is draw length.  The design of the release you 
choose may affect your draw length somewhat.  My draw length is on the 
long side.  I chose a truefire bering release with a pistol grip because 
is shortens my draw length.  If your are near the limits of your bows 
draw length adjustment, you may want to consider this.

Expect another bow tuning session if you make the switch, but that is 
half the fun of archery!


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Subject: Re: releases 
Date: Mon, 4 Mar 1996 17:27:26 GMT 
From: rlp@dr.att.com (Robert L. Prehn)
Reply-To: rlp@dr.att.com



In article <313A219C.564@ssdd.nrl.navy.mil>, Jack Yoder <yoder@ssdd.nrl.navy.mil> writes:
>In general, mechanical releases will improve your accuracy especially
>with a faster bow.  Another reply made reference to the effects of a
>changing to a mechanical release has on rest selection.  This is good
>advice.
>Another consideration when choosing a rest is serving wear.  If you
>shoot or practice alot with a caliper or bearing release you will go
>through servings much quicker than your are use to.  One solution to
>this is a rope type release.  The seem to be much kinder to the serving.
> Another solution is an ultra nock (made by QAD).  It replaces the nock
>set on your serving.  Your grab this device with your bering or caliper
>release instead of the serving.  It may weigh slightly more than a nock
>set.  Just another of the 1000's of tradeoff's in archery setup.  There
>are similar competing products, ultra nock is the one I use and I'm
>happy with it.
>
>Another consideration is draw length.  The design of the release you
>choose may affect your draw length somewhat.  My draw length is on the
>long side.  I chose a truefire bering release with a pistol grip because
>is shortens my draw length.  If your are near the limits of your bows
>draw length adjustment, you may want to consider this.
>
>Expect another bow tuning session if you make the switch, but that is
>half the fun of archery!
>
>Good Luck...

Good point about draw length changes & serving wear.  I was using a ball
bearing release and noticed some wear/separation of serving.  I switched
to a roller release and haven't noticed any wear problems.  The release
did cost a bundle though.

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Subject: Re: releases 
Date: 4 Mar 1996 23:47:08 GMT 
From: trier@pilot.msu.edu (Terry Trier)


In article <313A219C.564@ssdd.nrl.navy.mil>, yoder@ssdd.nrl.navy.mil says...
> Another solution is an ultra nock (made by QAD).  It replaces the nock
>set on your serving.  Your grab this device with your bering or caliper
>release instead of the serving.  It may weigh slightly more than a nock
>set.  Just another of the 1000's of tradeoff's in archery setup.  There
>are similar competing products, ultra nock is the one I use and I'm
>happy with it.

Jack,

And even simpler solution is to tie a piece of rope on your bowstring to
form a loop. It's easy, cheap, and very effective.  Two half hitches above
and two half hitches below the arrow nock, and melt the ends of the rope
into big knobs so the loop doesn't pull through.  I see more and more people
going to this, including the pros.  For instance, Burly Hall is shooting a
loop.  My favorite release for shooting with a loop is the Scott Little
Goose.  It has a very small head and I can get by with a very small loop.
I've also found that a rope release does not work with a loop.  I think the
rope swings through the loop and hits the arrow nock.

This has solved the problem for me for serving wear.  Hunting camp is no
place where you want your serving to break.  I'm shooting a rope release on
my target bow but I don't recommend a rope release for hunting.  A little
too awkward.

--
Terry M. Trier

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From: Jack Yoder <yoder@ssdd.nrl.navy.mil>
Subject: Re: releases
Date: Tue, 05 Mar 1996 21:58:55 -0500


Terry makes a good point.  A string loop has another advantage it is 
lighter than the ultra nock.  Tbe ultra nock is easy to adjust when 
tuning, but the another reason I use one is because of the fit with my 
release and arrows.  The make a model specifically for the Easton G 
Nocks which I use.  I use a pistol grip type bering release.  The 
ultra nock is solid and supports my release horizontally when I hunt 
from a tree stand.  

Another common problem that both the loop and ultra nock solve occurs 
with some short hunting bows with long draw lengths.  The worst cases 
I've seen seem to occur with Onieda's atypical bow design.  When drawn 
to a long draw length, the angle of the string with respect to the 
arrow is so acute that the string won't stay in the arrow nock.  
Usually, the arrow will stay on the string at full draw but not shoot 
consistantly.  Occasionally I've seen bows where the arrow actually 
falls of the bow at full draw.  Different nocks have different throat 
length and sometimes you can find one that will work, but because both 
the loop and ultra nock grip the serving both above and below the 
arrow nock and your release pulls from directly behind the arrow 
shaft, this problem disapears completely.

Good shooting,

Jack

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