Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers



Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers

From: <jcheun@Po-Box.McGill.ca> 
Date: 1996/02/27

I just got into archery recently, and I am wondering about the differences 
between plastic fletching vs. feathered fletching?

Could somebody tell me the advantages and disadvantages of each.  Right now
I am shooting 1816  Easton Gamegetter II's with feathered fletching.

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Subject: Re: Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers
From: ME! 
Date: 1996/02/28

   Both have positive and negative benifets...

PLASTIC:

 1.  More durable, usually will hold togeather even after blowing through a few targets.....
 2.  Plastic vanes are more quiet in flight......
 3.  Plastic is less forgiving if it comes in contact with anything upon release....

FEATHERS:
  
  1. More forgiving..........if they bush up against anything upon relesase it will 
     cause less deflection.
  2. Are more nosiey in flight....
  

  Bottom line is have confidence in whatever you use....  
   
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Subject: Re: Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers 
Date: 29 Feb 1996 08:15:51 GMT 
From: Stephen Selby <srselby@hk.super.net>


There will no doubt be a number of more expert views, but my $0.2 worth is that
plastic fletching does not lay down significantly and therefore poses serious
problems if shooting with a bare bow. With the thumb or fingers as the arrow rest,
your are likely to suffer cuts. That said, in those circumstances, it is also
important to ensure that the quills will not rise up and enter the hand when the
arrow is loosed. I achieve this by binding the front end of the fletching with silk
thread and then lacquering it.

The advantage of plastic fletching is that it can be moulded into a number of shapes
which can enhance the performance of modern arrows. The weight and shape can
also be consistently monitored in the manufacturing process. There is little point
in spending good money on sets of carbon arrows with a guaranteed consistency of
manufacture, and then fletching with goose quills which the Good Lord may have made
to a lower QC tolerance :-)


--
Stephen Selby

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Subject: Re: Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers 
Date: 29 Feb 1996 08:59:25 GMT 
From: Null <chapfam@mddc.com>


Feathers vs. Vains

I shoot traditional bows and have tried both feathers and vains.
In my experiance Vains are more durable and WATERPROOF!!
Feathers are yes more forgiving.. but if not protected and you hunt on
a rainy day.. your feathers get soaked... There is some things on the
market to keep them dry, but i have heard that camp dry (silicon
waterproof spray) and hairspray work well... Also I wieghed some feathers
vs. vains and the feathers were lighter by 10 grains.. thats 30 grians
less an arror... BUt its all what you want to shoot.. I once whatched a
hunting vidoe where all this guy would shoot is big bright yellow
feathers.. He seaid that he did this becuase that way a hunter could tell
better if he hit the game or not.. THe big yellow feathers were easier to
keep track of..


anyway its all personal choice


Chappy

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Subject: Re: Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers 
Date: Thu, 29 Feb 1996 14:49:29 UNDEFINED 
From: nye@mbi.org (Jeff Nye)


In article <4h3ptd$1uf@dsm6.dsmnet.com> Null <chapfam@mddc.com> writes:
>From: Null <chapfam@mddc.com>
>Subject: Re: Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers
>Date: 29 Feb 1996 08:59:25 GMT

>Feathers vs. Vains

>I shoot traditional bows and have tried both feathers and vains.
>In my experiance Vains are more durable and WATERPROOF!!
>Feathers are yes more forgiving.. but if not protected and you hunt on
>a rainy day.. your feathers get soaked... There is some things on the
>market to keep them dry, but i have heard that camp dry (silicon
>waterproof spray) and hairspray work well... Also I wieghed some feathers
>vs. vains and the feathers were lighter by 10 grains.. thats 30 grians
>less an arror... BUt its all what you want to shoot.. I once whatched a
>hunting vidoe where all this guy would shoot is big bright yellow
>feathers.. He seaid that he did this becuase that way a hunter could tell
>better if he hit the game or not.. THe big yellow feathers were easier to
>keep track of..


>anyway its all personal choice


>Chappy
>chapfam@mddc.com

It's also easier to find the arrow after shots, too.

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Subject: Re: Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers 
Date: Sat, 02 Mar 96 07:07:18 PDT 
From: Perry Ratcliff <ratcliff@mailsrv1.trw.com>


>      I just got into archery recently, and I am wondering about the
differences between plastic fletching vs. feathered fletching?
> Could somebody tell me the advantages and disadvantages of each.  Right now
I am shooting 1816  Easton Gamegetter II's
> with feathered fletching.

Feathers provide more guidance control than plastic vanes.  They are great for
hunting where the fletching needs to compensate for the planing effect of
broadheads.  They are also good for indoor shooting where speed is not
important.

Many people also use feathers for outdoor competition outdoors, but I would
not recommend them for the following reasons.  You lose too much arrow speed
downrange.  The arrows are subject to more wind drift than arrows fletched
with plastic fletching.  Feathers cannot stand up to the abuse of arrows
grouping in a spot.

Good Shooting!

Perry

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Subject: Re: Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers 
Date: Sun, 3 Mar 1996 18:59:59 -0800 
From: "D. Karosich" <eatcoug@u.washington.edu>



I would also have to add that when the feather fletchings get wet they
don't do you any good.  Stick with the plastic vanes.
        
Darin at the University of Washington

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Subject: Re: Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers
Date: 6 Mar 1996 05:13:29 GMT

If you hunt, here's some important information. Two seasons ago I was 
hunting with some friends who used vanes (I used feathers, at the time). 
My friend suggested that the previous season he had missed a deer that 
heard his feathers coming and jumped the string. I challenged him, so we 
set up a test.  We put a backstop just off the poarch and had him back up 
35 yeards back along the side of the cabin. He them proceeded to shoot 
several arrows with vanes and several with feathers. The difference was 
striking.

For the arrows fletched with feathers, it sounded like a zipper coming 
down the lane (zzzZZZZIP). You could heard the arrow approaching once it 
was within about 20 yards. When he shot the vanes, on the other hand, 
there was no sound until the arrow hit the backstop. Nothing. The 
approach of the arrow was *MUCH* more surprising (i.e., silent) when 
using the arros fletched with vanes.

I've shot both feathers and vanes for a while. While feathers are (in my 
opinion) a little more forgiving, vanes are my first choice when hunting 
from a compound bow. (recurve and stick bow archers are more limited).

Silent Hunting,
Dwayne Paschall
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From: sunfire@muskoka.com (Stephen & Krista Fraser)
Subject: Re: Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers
Date: Thu, 07 Mar 1996 22:01:19 GMT

>Feathers vs. Vains

>I shoot traditional bows and have tried both feathers and vains.
>In my experiance Vains are more durable and WATERPROOF!!
>Feathers are yes more forgiving.. but if not protected and you hunt on 
>a rainy day.. your feathers get soaked... There is some things on the 

>anyway its all personal choice

I'm a big fan of natural feathers.  I figure if you're going to go
traditional, there is no reason to stop half way.  

I prefer Canada Goose primaries over any plastic vane.  Being a water
fowl, the goose feathers are waterproof and shed water easily - and
being primaries, they _rarely_ lose their shape.

I've found that no matter what, natural feathers can handle more
punishment than any plastic vane can take.  If a plastic vane doesn't
rip apart after continuous use, it'll seperate from the shaft.  (I
haven't yet found a glue that'll hold them on through thick and thin.)
I love feathers because, once stripped (not split), ordinary yellow
glue will hold 'em on no matter what.  Besides, they can be bound with
thread for added strength and a more "traditional feel".

Go with feathers.
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From: brip@tricon.net (JR)
Subject: Re: Arrows -- plastic vanes vs. feathers
Date: Mon, 11 Mar 1996 19:17:26 -0600

In article <4hj6tq$sie@alterdial.UU.NET>, paschall@HUB.ofthe.NET (Dwayne
Paschall) wrote:
There can be no doubt that accuracy is the hunter's biggest responsiblity
to the sport.  Without shooting accuracy there is nothing.  Feather
fletched arrows are without a doubt more accurate than vanes.  They are
also a bit faster out of the bow, although this decreases downrange due to
drag.  I want the most forgiving setup avasilable when I'm in the field,
so feathers are my choice.  People exaggerate the noise factor associated
with feathers.  I don't believe in the beneits of silencing bowstrings or
using quieter vanes.  If a deer is alert, ready to bolt, a queit arrow is
still very loud to the deer and its reaction to avid just as quick and
responsive.  So, deciding wheather to fling a "quiet" whizzing arrow or a
"loud" whizzing arrow seems trite to me.  The only way quieting can
benefit the hunter is in case of a clean miss, perhaps less noise will
lead to a second shot.  But, these scenarios are, as you know, few and far
between.  Ultimately, it should depend on your set-up.  If there is no
accuracy difference between feathers and vanes prehaps the vanes'
durability justifies their use.  Remember though, the forgiveness is not
as appreciated under the "controlled" practice range conditions as when
the nerves are on edge in the tree.

BR


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